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Kids Got Too Much Candy this Halloween? Here Are Some Options!

If your Halloween ended up like hours, a short time spent trick or tricking resulted in a ridiculous quantity of candy. Luckily for me, the risk of finding shellfish in my boys' candy stash is exceedingly low. The same sense of relief does not extend to the families of kids with other food allergies, such as milk, egg, peanut or tree nuts. So, what's a candy-overloaded family to do? Here are a few ideas:

1. Let mom and dad eat it. Just kidding. Not really. :-/

2. Invite the "Switch Witch" over for a visit! She takes the candy, and leaves a cool toy in its place!

3. Send your candy to our troops serving abroad! Your donated candy will be included in care packages. Operation Gratitude does a great job: http://opgrat.wordpress.com/2013/07/18/halloween-candy-for-the-troops/

4. Ask your local dentist or allergist about Halloween candy buy-backs! Maybe your kids will make a few bucks... see below for a picture of a few of my patients visiting their dentist during a candy buy back event. They look pretty happy too me!



5. Donate the candy to a local food pantry, community center, or shelter. Ask first, to see if they are accepting candy donations.

6. Throw it away. There will be more next year, and it's just sugar anyway.

Comments

  1. Hi Allergist Mommy,

    I created a website (http://www.asthmanatural.com/) to help people with asthma so they can deal with it better.
    I know it's tough as i have seen how bad it can be. Therefore, i want to help them as much as i can.

    If you like to help the asthma community and participate in a link exchange, I would be happy to do so!
    Please check my website out:http://www.asthmanatural.com/
    I hope it helps. Thank you so much.

    Cheers,
    Xing Tingkai

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thanks for this tremendous post and your idea.

    ReplyDelete

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